Human Remains Displayed in Strange Places

Here’s what I think about: What if Sylvia, by some crazy turn of events, is actually Amelia Earhart? And the partially embalmed Sylvester might be the body of Kansas Sheriff Thomas Gannon who mysteriously disappeared in 1868, or James William Boyd, the Confederate officer said to have been killed in place of John Wilkes Booth, who was supposed to rendezvous with others in Mexico but never showed up. Wouldn’t it be crazy if these bodies displayed to the public for centuries were actually famous missing people, and under our noses the whole time? (Seriously, that is what I think about. Maybe I should write a book about it. :)

Thanks to Strange Remains for all the fascinating posts!

Strange Remains

Cultures have displayed human remains as part of their mortuary practices and as gruesome trophies since ancient times.   Today human remains can be seen in museums, in churches and ossuaries, in universities, and even in art galleries. Though certainly ethically dubious, there are a few odd places across the country where human remains can be seen and have become part of local folklore.

Below are some of the strangest places human remains are displayed today – I’m sure there are tons more out there.

Mummies in a Public Bathroom

Phlippi Mummies on displayed at the Barbour County Historical Society in West Virginia.  Image Credit: Screen grab from West Virginia Public Broadcasting Phlippi Mummies on displayed at the Barbour County Historical Society in West Virginia. Image Credit: Screen grab from West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In the 1880s, Graham Hamrick, a farmer and part-time undertaker in Philippi, West Virginia, experimented with embalming fluid on fruits and vegetables and animals in order to find the best method for preserving human remains.  When he felt…

View original post 913 more words

~ by S.K. Epperson on August 19, 2014.

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